On Black History

It’s just like when you’ve got some coffee that’s too black, which means it’s too strong.  What do you do?  You integrate it with cream, you make it weak.  But if you pour too much cream in it, you won’t even know you ever had coffee.  It used to be hot, it becomes cool.  It used to be strong, it becomes weak.  It used to wake you up, now it puts you to sleep.  ~Malcolm X

Faces of Our History: Daisy Bates

Grown Folk Talk Radio

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Daisy Lee Gatson was born in Huttig, Arkansas on November 11, 1914. Shortly, after giving birth to Daisy’s mother was sexually assaulted & murdered by three white men. He father left shortly after that and Daisy was raised by a family friend.

On her adoptive father’s death bed he gave her advice on her pining anger for the lack of justice for her mother’s death:

“You’re filled with hatred. Hate can destroy you, Daisy. Don’t hate white people just because they’re white. If you hate, make it count for something. Hate the humiliations we are living under in the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the soul of every black man and woman. Hate the insults hurled at us by white scum—and then try to do something about it, or your hate won’t spell a thing.” via Wikipedia

At age…

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On Black History

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Faces of Our History: Bayard Rustin

Grown Folk Talk Radio

untitledBayard Rustin was born on March 17, 1912 in West Chester, Pennsylvania to Florence Rustin and Archie Hopkins. Bayard was raised by his mother’s parents Julia & Janifer Rustin. His grandmother Julia was a member of the NAACP, Rustin grew up seeing the widely recognized people who were leaders in the NAACP in his home. This is what spark is interesting in racial discrimination.

In September of 1932, Rustin enter a historically black college named Wilberforce University. There he was active in various campus organizations but was expelled 4 years later for organizing a strike.

Shorty after moving to Harlem in 1937, he was involved in the Scottsboro Boys case. Where 9 young black men in Alabama were accused of raping 2 white women on a train in 1931.

In 1947, Bayard and George Houser organized the Journey of Reconciliation. It was the first of the more commonly known “Freedom Rides”. The…

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Is religion a dating deal breaker? Pt. 1